Honoring the Life of Dr. Miriam Labbok

We are heartbroken to share with you that Miriam Labbok, MD, MPH, IBCLC, passed away on 13 August 2016.

Dr. Miriam Labbok

Dr. Miriam Labbok

Miriam was a true leader in our field, making countless contributions to human health through breastfeeding. The University of North Carolina’s Gillings School of Global Public Health has ably documented many of those accomplishments here. Among the many places her professional contributions were celebrated included the recent ILCA conference, where she was conferred the Journal of Human Lactation’s Patricia Martens Award for Excellence in Breastfeeding Research.

Miriam (seated, right) with members of the ILCA and WABA board and staff.

Miriam (seated, right) with members of the ILCA and WABA board and staff.

Harder to capture in a press release or blog post are the many, many lives she touched through her thoughtful mentoring of emerging and seasoned lactation professionals and advocates. The World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action has established a tribute wall, where some of these stories are captured.

ILCA Executive Director Dick Padlo had the honor of sharing his remembrances of Miriam in the guest book at her funeral. We welcome you to share the impact she had on your life here in the comments. We will share these stories with her family.

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Submissions OPEN for Journal of Human Lactation Photo Contest

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Every year, the Journal of Human Lactation (JHL) hosts a photo contest for the coveted cover spot on each edition. The JHL is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal publishing original research, insights in practice and policy, commentaries, and case reports relating to research and practice in human lactation and breastfeeding. The annual photo contest is your opportunity to contribute to the journal and highlight your community. We’ve invited the JHL staff to tell us more about how you can join in the contest.

The four photos on JHL’s cover are changed annually. JHL is your journal, and we want to feature your photos! The four photos portray the broad field of human lactation, including the IBCLC helping new families (in a wide variety of scenarios), breastfeeding in various cultural contexts around the globe, and the science of lactation.

Guidelines:

  • Keep the photo simple: Focus on the subject while limiting background items and distractions.
  • High Resolution and Size: Photos must meet the MINIMUM specifications of being a jpeg file, 300DPI; and at least 4″ tall and wide. Please do not send photos of lesser size and resolution. They cannot be used for print publication. Photos which do not meet these specifications can not be considered.
  • Keep Cropping in Mind: For our cover, we must crop images to a square. Please either submit your photos in this manner or be aware of how this cropping could impact your photo. Photos which can not be cropped to a square can not be considered.
  • Photo Consent: If a recognizable person is in the photo (e.g., the face of a mother/baby/clinician etc.), you must include a signed photo consent form with your submission. If your photo is a contender for publication, we will require these subjects to sign a specific consent form, so only send photos if you know you can obtain permission from the subject(s).

Rules:

  • Deadline – 15 October 2016: NO EXCEPTIONS
  • Email your photos to admin@ilca.org.
  • Include your name, and if you are not the photographer, the name of the photographer, full contact information.
  • You will receive an auto response email to confirm your submission.
  • The photographer you will need to sign a non-exclusive copyright agreement – in other words, allowing JHL to use the photo but not limiting the photographer’s use of the image.

 

Questions? Email admin@ilca.org.

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World Breastfeeding Week: Access FREE Articles from Journal of Human Lactation

World Breastfeeding Week: FREE Articles in the Journal of Human Lactation

World Breastfeeding Week (WBW) is an annual celebration of the role of breastfeeding in our homes, our communities, and the world.  As a part of our 2016 theme, Breastfeeding: A Key to Sustainable Development, we are proud to announce that Journal of Human Lactation (JHL) is making available 10 essential articles to everyone – FREE through 1 September 2016.

 

The Journal of Human Lactation is essential for building our knowledge as IBCLCs. We believe knowledge guides our practice, strengthens our value, and supports our role in transforming world health.

 

Read the following JHL articles—free through 1 September 2016!*

  1. Suck-Swallow-Breathe Dynamics in Breastfed Infants
  2. Weighing the Facts: A Systematic Review of Expected Patterns of Weight Loss in Full-Term, Breastfed Infants
  3. Therapeutic Breast Massage in Lactation for the Management of Engorgement, Plugged Ducts, and Mastitis
  4. Behavior of the Newborn during Skin-to-Skin
  5. Breastfeeding Duration and Primary Reasons for Breastfeeding Cessation among Women with Postpartum Depressive Symptoms
  6. Breastfeeding Self-efficacy: A Critical Review of Available Instruments
  7. Transfer of Methamphetamine (MA) into Breast Milk and Urine of Postpartum Women who Smoked MA Tablets during Pregnancy: Implications for Initiation of Breastfeeding
  8. Cultural Determinants of Optimal Breastfeeding Practices among Indigenous Mam-Mayan Women in the Western Highlands of Guatemala
  9. Effect of Cup Feeding and Bottle Feeding on Breastfeeding in Late Preterm Infants: A Randomized Controlled Study
  10. Self-Reported Reasons for Breastfeeding Cessation among Low-Income Women Enrolled in a Peer Counseling Breastfeeding Support Program

 

Journal of Human Lactation is the official journal of ILCA. It is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal publishing original research, insights in practice and policy, commentaries, and case reports relating to research and practice in human lactation and breastfeeding. JHL is relevant to lactation professionals in clinical practice, public health, research, and a broad range of fields related to the trans-disciplinary field of human lactation.

*You may already have access to these articles through a library or other subscription.

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World Breastfeeding Week: Supporting Breastfeeding for Women’s Productivity and Employment

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The 2016 World Breastfeeding Week (WBW) theme is Breastfeeding: A Key to Sustainable Development. Join International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) and World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) in observing WBW 1-7 August 2016. To find out more about the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and available #WBW2016 resources, read this Lactation Matters post.

At the World Breastfeeding Week website, WABA explains how breastfeeding is linked to each of the SDGs along four thematic areas. Throughout the week, ILCA will highlight each of these themes to help you better understand the SDGs and learn how to connect your critical local efforts to these larger international goals.

WBW Theme #4: Women’s Productivity and Employment

Breastfeeding plays an important role in reducing poverty (SDG 1); ensuring quality education and lifelong learning (SDG 4); increasing gender equality (SDG 5); promoting inclusive work opportunities (SDG 8); building industry, innovation, and infrastructure (SDG 9);  and eliminating disparities in and among countries (SDG 10).

Around the world, governments are emphasizing women’s participation in the labor force as a solution for economic growth, gender equality, and poverty reduction. Women are often forced to accept poorly paid, low-quality jobs. About 830 million women, mainly in developing countries, lack social protection in their job situation that might enable them to continue caring for their families as they had before.

Without protections for paid maternity leave, flexible scheduling, and breaks to pump or breastfeed, breastfeeding rates for working women decrease. This reduction in breastfeeding may come with an increase in childhood illnesses, resulting in time away from school for children and employment for their parents. Maternity leave policies are effective in increasing exclusive breastfeeding rates. Only 53% of countries meet the International Labor Organization’s 14 week minimum standard for maternity leave. In fact, every additional month of paid maternity leave decreases infant mortality rates by 13%. Incorporating lactation rooms and paid breastfeeding breaks can increase breastfeeding at six months.

Women’s unpaid caring activities in the household are important to the health, development, and well-being of all family members and must be recognized in economic and social development strategies. To narrow the gender gap at work, women need support to combine their productive and reproductive roles, and this support must incorporate the time and structures necessary for continued breastfeeding.

What support do women receive for breastfeeding when they return to work in YOUR community?

  • Promote paid parental protection policies that are gender equitable and which support co-parenting and breastfeeding.
  • Talk to some local employers about how they could make their workplaces supportive for breastfeeding.
  • Find out your country’s laws surrounding maternity protection, including the type of leave and workplace facilities most local employers are providing.
  • Advocate at all levels and between sectors for the needs and rights of maternity protection of workers in both the formal and informal employment sectors.
  • Encourage politicians and officials in your country to assess the status of their current maternity and parental protection entitlements using existing tools such as the World Breastfeeding Trends Initiative (WBTi).

For the most up-to-date information about WBW 2016 and to download and purchase promotional materials, please visit the World Breastfeeding Week website by clicking here.

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World Breastfeeding Week: Environment and Climate Change

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The 2016 World Breastfeeding Week (WBW) theme is Breastfeeding: A Key to Sustainable Development. Join International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) and World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) in observing WBW 1-7 August 2016. To find out more about the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and available #WBW2016 resources, read this Lactation Matters post.

At the World Breastfeeding Week website, WABA explains how breastfeeding is linked to each of the SDGs along four thematic areas. Throughout the week, ILCA will highlight each of these themes to help you better understand the SDGs and learn how to connect your critical local efforts to these larger international goals.

WBW Theme #3: Environment and Climate Change

Breastfeeding plays an important role in clean water and sanitation (SDG 6); the use of affordable, clean energy (SDG 7); developing safe, sustainable communities (SDG 11); encouraging responsible consumption and production (SDG 12); taking action on climate change (SDG 13); and caring for seas and marine life (SDG 14), as well as our terrestrial environment and its inhabitants (SDG 15).

Breastfeeding is the first practical step we can take to protect not only the health of babies and mothers, but also the health of our planet. It is the most vulnerable populations that are most affected by more-violent and less-predictable natural disasters resulting from climate change.  Finding ways to encourage continued breastfeeding and (when necessary) relactation can help safeguard children’s health and the health of the environment, while comforting traumatized families.

Although not yet quantifiable in monetary terms, there are clear environmental costs associated with not breastfeeding babies. Artificial feeding is a contributing factor to global warming, which is causing climate change. Breastmilk is a “natural, renewable food” that is environmentally safe and produced and delivered to the consumer “without pollution, packaging, or waste.”

Formula production and use generate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, which accelerate global warming and produce pollution and toxic emissions upon disposal. 720,450 tons of milk formula sold annually in six Asian countries generated almost 2.9 million tons of GHG. This is equivalent to nearly 7000 million miles driven by an average passenger vehicle or 1.03 million tons of waste sent to landfill sites.

Breastfeeding helps the transition to a low-carbon economy from one based on fossil fuels. No electricity is needed to produce breastmilk, and it requires no fuel for transport. This reduces overall emissions of carbon dioxide, the principal greenhouse gas, and enables greater economic autonomy for individuals and communities.

Many places already suffer from a lack of consistent, clean water sources. Amidst the devastation caused by this increase in the amount and nature of natural disasters, artificial feeding is even more risky, as an increased lack of clean water and infrastructure make it difficult to ensure the safe preparation of baby food. And this is no small concern. It is estimated that more than 4000 liters of water are needed to produce 1 kg of breastmilk substitute powder.

What can you say to people in YOUR community about breastfeeding and the environment?

  • Encourage your government to include improvement of breastfeeding practices as part of their work for achieving the SDGs.
  • Encourage researchers to quantify the carbon footprint of formula feeding in your country.
  • Use this data to lobby your governments to allocate a budget for policies and programs to increase breastfeeding alongside those allocated to reduce pollution.
  • Demand the inclusion of breastfeeding in any list of actions to reduce our carbon and water footprint and in discussions about climate change.

For the most up-to-date information about WBW 2016 and to download and purchase promotional materials, please visit the World Breastfeeding Week website by clicking here.

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World Breastfeeding Week: Survival, Health, and Well-Being

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The 2016 World Breastfeeding Week (WBW) theme is Breastfeeding: A Key to Sustainable Development. Join International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) and World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) in observing WBW 1-7 August 2016. To find out more about the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and available #WBW2016 resources, read this Lactation Matters post.

At the World Breastfeeding Week website, WABA explains how breastfeeding is linked to each of the SDGs along four thematic areas. Throughout the week, ILCA will highlight each of these themes to help you better understand the SDGs and learn how to connect your critical local efforts to these larger international goals.

WBW Theme #2: Survival, Health, and Well-Being

Breastfeeding plays an important role in reducing poverty (SDG 1); promoting the general health and well-being of families (SDG 3); ensuring quality education and lifelong learning (SDG 4); eliminating disparities in and among countries (SDG 10); and developing safe, sustainable communities (SDG 11).

Envision a child born in a poor urban area. Her family considers breastfeeding a natural and integral part of her care. Their healthcare provider is trained to provide breastfeeding support. With a healthy baby at home, her mother is able to work. The child is successful in school, in part, because breastmilk has helped her develop well, grow, and remain healthy. The contribution of breastfeeding to the health of both mother and child can help this family rise out of poverty and into a better future.

Breastfeeding provides the foundation for lifelong health and well-being. Children and mothers who do not breastfeed are at greater risk for many conditions including acute and chronic illness for children, and breast and ovarian cancer for mothers. 823,000 children die annually due to sub-optimal infant feeding practices. 20,000 deaths due to breast cancer could be averted if  mothers breastfed optimally.

The financial cost of a program to implement the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF’s Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding in 214 countries is estimated at $130 per live birth. This investment in breastfeeding support is likely to pay off financially in as little as one or two years, and pay off academically immediately. (On average, babies who are breastfed have a 2.6 point higher intelligence quotient than non-breastfed babies.)

What does breastfeeding look like in YOUR community? How many facilities are Baby-Friendly?

  • Talk to politicians and other leaders about the value of improving breastfeeding rates to achieve the SDGs.
  • Work to ensure that everyone in the community have access to skilled breastfeeding care.
  • Advocate for national health regulations which ensure that the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding are integrated into maternity care at all birthing facilities.
  • Advocate for breastfeeding to be fully included in the curriculum for pre-service training of all physicians and nurses.

For the most up-to-date information about WBW 2016 and to download and purchase promotional materials, please visit the World Breastfeeding Week website by clicking here.

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World Breastfeeding Week: Supporting Breastfeeding for Nutrition, Food Security, and Poverty Reduction

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The 2016 World Breastfeeding Week (WBW) theme is Breastfeeding: A Key to Sustainable Development. Join International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) and World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) in observing WBW 1-7 August 2016. To find out more about the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and available #WBW2016 resources, read this Lactation Matters post.

At the World Breastfeeding Week website, WABA explains how breastfeeding is linked to each of the SDGs along four thematic areas. Throughout the week, ILCA will highlight each of these themes to help you better understand the SDGs and learn how to connect your critical local efforts to these larger international goals.

WBW Theme #1: Nutrition, Food Security, and Poverty Reduction

Breastfeeding plays an important role in reducing poverty (SDG 1); addressing food safety, nutrition, and insecurity (SDG 2); promoting the general health and well-being of families (SDG 3); and creating sustainable consumption patterns (SDG 12).

Envision an isolated land where famine is common, where mothers are known to breastfeed their children until they become toddlers. These mothers know that breastfeeding is sustenance and food security for their young children. In low-income areas particularly, mothers commonly stop breastfeeding only when they feel that their child is big and strong enough to no longer need that  protection.

Undernutrition, including sub-optimal breastfeeding, underlies 45% of all deaths of children under 5 annually. The  most prevalent form of malnutrition, nutritional stunting (low height for age), is already prevalent at birth and continues to increase sharply until 24 months of age. The window of opportunity for reducing stunting is 1000 days from conception until two years of age. Early investments in prevention of low birth weight and stunting, and early initiation of and exclusive breastfeeding, contribute to reducing the risk of later obesity and chronic diseases.

In addition to the benefits to overall health and sustainability, breastfeeding can contribute to financial independence and sustainability. Not breastfeeding is associated with economic losses of about $302 billion annually or .49% of world gross national income. Families worldwide spend an estimated $54 billion annually purchasing milk formula. Also, adults who were breastfed as children were found to have higher incomes than those who were not breastfed.

What role can breastfeeding have in promoting good nutrition and food security in YOUR community?

  • Talk to mothers and local health services. Plan actions based on what you learn about the situation in your community.
  • Engage entire families to discuss the importance of infant feeding and how they can support breastfeeding women in their homes and their communities.
  • Help people in your community to see breastfeeding, timely complementary feeding, and continued breastfeeding up to two years or beyond as normal.
  • Ensure that local health facilities, pharmacies, and grocery stores adhere to the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes.
  • Work with agricultural extension programs to extend breastfeeding support to rural communities.

For the most up-to-date information about WBW 2016 and to download and purchase promotional materials, please visit the World Breastfeeding Week website by clicking here.

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Celebrate World Breastfeeding Week: 1-7 August 2016

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World Breastfeeding Week (WBW) is an annual celebration of the role of breastfeeding in our homes, our communities, and the world. The 2016 theme is Breastfeeding: A Key to Sustainable Development. Join International Lactation Consultant Association® (ILCA®) and World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) in observing WBW 1-7 August 2016.

In September 2015, world leaders committed to 17 goals aimed at ending poverty, protecting the planet, and ensuring prosperity. These goals are known as the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). At ILCA, we believe that world health can be transformed through breastfeeding and skilled lactation care. One way to ensure the world’s leaders know what we know—the lifelong outcomes of breastfeeding for mothers and their children—is to show the connections between these outcomes and the 17 SDGs.

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WABA, with assistance from its core partners (including ILCA), has created content explaining how breastfeeding is linked to each of the SDGs along four thematic areas:

  1. Nutrition, Food Security, and Poverty Reduction;
  2. Survival, Health, and Well-Being;
  3. Environment and Climate Change; and
  4. Women’s Productivity and Employment.

Throughout the week, ILCA will highlight each of these themes to help you better understand them and learn how you can help in addressing them.

Looking for more ways to participate in World Breastfeeding Week this year?

Visit the WBW 2016 website for general information and downloadable promotional materials, including the WBW 2016 Action Folder.

Sign the WBW 2016 Event Pledge Form and let everyone know that you or your organization pledge to celebrate WBW 2016 by hosting a WBW event.

Share your commitment to breastfeeding advocacy and education as an imperative part of accomplishing the SDGs.

For the most up-to-date information about WBW 2016 and to download and purchase promotional materials, please visit the World Breastfeeding Week website by clicking here.

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Catch Up With #ILCA16

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Thanks to our amazing on-site and live streaming community at #ILCA16, we have shared information around the globe about clinical skills, cutting-edge research, advocacy, and the global breastfeeding agenda.

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More than 200 of you shared more than 3,000 posts on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest, reaching more than 300,000 members of the lactation community with more than 6 million “impressions” (views of content). We couldn’t be more grateful for the ways that our community is amplifying the ways that world health is being transformed through breastfeeding and skilled lactation care.

In case you missed it, here’s a round up of some of the social media shared during the conference.

President’s Address: Michele Griswold

Plenary: Growth Charts: Use and Misuse – Carlos Gonzalez, MD

Plenary: Organizational Effect of Mother’s Milk on Infant Outcomes: Katie Hinde, PhD

Plenary: Beyond BFHI: The Expansion of the Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative to Neonatal Care

Plenary: My Brain is Doing What? Bias, Ethics, & the Lactation Specialist: Cynthia Good Mojab, MS, LMHCA, IBCLC, RLC

Plenary: WHO and the Baby Friendly Initiative: Laurence Grummer-Strawn, MPA, MA, PhD

Please come check out our Storify site here for more roundups as they are added, as well as roundups from previous ILCA conferences.

Huge thanks to ILCA Equity Committee Member and Secretary Tori Sproat for compiling these Storify summaries of the Twitter stream and to all of the conference participants who shared on the #ILCA16 hashtag. A special thanks to the following Tweeps for their contributions to our social media outreach:         @CoachLindaSmith

Also, a special thank you to Jodine Chase for her role moderating the live streaming on Saturday.

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Honoring a Lifetime of Global Advocacy: Margot Mann

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At #ILCA16 today, Margot Mann, IBCLC, RLC, BA, was honored for her lifetime of advocacy work on behalf of breastfeeding families and the IBCLC. From her role as ILCA’s Vice President for External Affairs, to her groundbreaking work elevating lactation in the global arena, Mann’s policy work has no doubt preserved, promoted, and protected breastfeeding.

We asked Margot to tell us about herself and her more than thirty years of work in the lactation field. Please join us in honoring Mann’s ILCA Lifetime Achievement Award while learning about this important history for the profession.

 

Tell us about where you live.

I live in Riverdale in the Bronx, New York City. I was born in Leeton, a little country town in Australia. I grew up in Melbourne and moved to the US when my first two children were very young.

 

What is your role in lactation?

I have multiple roles: clinician, educator, policy maker and advocate for breastfeeding, mothers, babies, families and the IBCLC profession.

 

Please tell us about the many “firsts” you have had as a groundbreaking leader in lactation.

In 1991, I set up the lactation program at Magee Women’s Hospital in Pittsburgh. At that time, it was the country’s largest private women’s hospital, delivering 10,000 babies per year with low breastfeeding rates. I wrote breastfeeding policies, gave in-services to the nursing staff, helped nursing mothers in need, and provided Grand Rounds to physicians. The program continues and breastfeeding rates have risen.

In 1986 I set up the first lactation consultant private practice in Queens, New York.

 

What calls you to lactation work?

Before my children were born, I was a high school teacher. Being a full-time mother, carrying, birthing, nursing and raising my children to be happy, healthy, contributing members of society is the thing that I am most proud of. Breastfeeding was easy for me. My babies taught me how to do it and I had wonderful support from my family. I was sorry to see how many other mothers were frustrated and had difficulty breastfeeding. I felt they and their babies were cheated of the support they needed. I repeatedly saw evidence of the impact of flawed advice they received from healthcare providers and others. I wanted to help mothers have the pleasures of nursing that I had experienced.

So, I became a La Leche League leader. Then, the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE) was formed and in 1986, I became International Board Certified Lactation Consultant. It is a privilege and great pleasure to help mothers in the process of matrescence to achieve their nursing goals. I feel very lucky to be doing this work.

 

What is your proudest accomplishment as a policy advocate?

My personal role was minor, but it is gratifying to see the growing respect given to lactation consultants and the specialized help we offer to nursing dyads. My role in policy work has spanned over 30 years, from representing La Leche League International at the UN to presenting ILCA’s credentials to the UN Economic and Social Council in 1995, and onward until this year.

In the 1980’s, WHO and UNICEF’s child mortality prevention strategy was “GOBI” – Growth monitoring, Oral rehydration, Breastfeeding and Immunization. The need for support for the “B” was rarely recognized. At NGO Committee on UNICEF (NGOCU) meetings, I repeatedly reminded participants, “But but but, don’t forget the B of breastfeeding. It needs protection, promotion and support.”

To build support for the “B”, I created a very well attended day-long seminar at the UN, “Breastfeeding: The Passport for Life,” along with Beth Styer. The goal was to educate and sensitize all mother and child advocates to the importance of breastfeeding in child mortality and morbidity reduction. We were VERY surprised by the attendance and excitement this seminar generated. It seemed to make our voice at the NGOCU meetings more valued. The issues of breastfeeding simply had not been considered by NGOCU participants as anything that needed to be considered. Breastfeeding was seen as a good idea, but didn’t every mother have breasts and the option to decide whether or not to use them to feed her baby? There was no understanding that this option could be undermined or needed support.

At the UN, I was one of many who contributed to the writing of the Convention on the Rights on the Child and the Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding, advocating for breastfeeding dyads. It was very exciting to see some of our language included in the final documents.

To create a stronger breastfeeding lobby, I created a UN Breastfeeding Advocacy Team (UNBAT) uniting NGOs who recognized the importance of breastfeeding. The UNBAT name added power and lent credibility to our efforts at the UN General Assembly Special Session. The UNBAT name made it possible for us to make a few “interventions” (i.e. speak from the floor of the UN General Assembly) to make our recommendation for policy changes directly to the delegates.

As ILCA’s Vice President for External Affairs (2000 – 2004) I reached out to international health professional organizations to encourage them to adopt the Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding. Some did, while others probably became aware of GSFIYCF for the first time.

I sought out talented IBCLCs and LLLLs to share in the work at the UN and helped them learn how to do this sensitive, diplomatic advocacy work. There is now a global Breastfeeding Advocacy Initiative led by UNICEF and WHO which builds on this early international work and holds great hope for greater protection, promotion, and support of breastfeeding. ILCA remains a part of this work.

 

Is there anyone you would like to thank?

Wasn’t I lucky to have been given such an opportunity to participate and influence global policy and promote the work of IBCLCs?

Above all, every mother I have been able to help with her maternal role of breastfeeding thrills me. I consider myself a lucky lady!

I thank my children for teaching me how to nurse and the need to respect each baby as an individual with unique needs. And I thank my husband and partner, John Mann, who was such an enormous support in my mothering and professional work, and my parents and family who were with me all the way. And I deeply appreciate the inspiration and wisdom from colleagues from whom I learned so much, especially people, like the late Chris Mulford who wrote the bulk of the UNBAT position papers we presented at the UN.

We are grateful to Margot for her incredible work to promote, protect, and support breastfeeding.

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