Archive | IBCLC Day 2017

Is Your Baby in Special Care? Best Tips from Lactation Professionals

“If my baby needs special care in the hospital, what do I need to know about breastfeeding?” Parents often approach lactation consultants with questions about breastfeeding/chestfeeding and babies with special needs.

We asked our members to share some tips and strategies with families.

“I would recommend spending as much time skin-to-skin with baby as long as both mom and babe are medically stable, start pumping/and or hand expressing colostrum within 6 hours of delivery, give any expressed colostrum to the baby, and allow baby to explore mom’s breasts and nipples as tolerated, even if baby is unable to suckle just yet. Give the baby a name and talk to him as much as possible.” -Jenna Gilbert, IBCLC

“That breastmilk is so important for babies with special needs and to continue breastfeeding with least separation from baby that is medically possible. Make sure you get in touch with an IBCLC® for support and start hand expression, as well as pumping, if separated for feeds and establishing your milk supply.” -Angie Hilliard, IBCLC

“The sooner you can contact a lactation consultant in this scenario, the better. The very basic thing all parents need to know—even if baby will not require special care—is the power of skin-to-skin and touch. Parents also need to remember “8 or more in 24” to remind themselves how many times they need to stimulate their breasts to build milk supply during this time.” -Tori LaChapelle Sproat, IBCLC

“Skin-to-skin [as soon as possible] and pumping or hand expression for mom within 6 hours of delivery, if not sooner. Get in touch with the lactation team [as soon as possible].” -Jill Stailey Benner, IBCLC

Find an IBCLC to help with your questions about lactation and employment or your other breastfeeding questions.

Find an IBCLC

What is an IBCLC?

An International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC) is a healthcare professional specializing in the clinical management of breastfeeding and lactation.

An IBCLC is an invaluable asset to breastfeeding families, reassuring you when lactation are going well, and by providing information and support to help prevent and manage common concerns. IBCLCs help with:

  • Prenatal counseling about the factors that may affect breastfeeding, chestfeeding, and lactation
  • Basic position and latch of the infant
  • Information about practices that promote successful lactation
  • Preventing and managing common concerns such as poor latch, inadequate milk transfer or supply, nipple or breast/chest pain, and calming a fussy baby
  • Milk expression and storage for parents who must be separated from their babies
  • Strategies for lactation after returning to work
  • Breastfeeding and lactation in challenging situations, such as feeding twins or triplets, a premature or sick infant, or infants in special medical situations.

Lactation consultants, do you have other tips to share?

Families, do you have questions? Share them here!

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Breastfeeding and Employment: Best Tips from Lactation Professionals

“How can I make lactation work with my employment?” Breastfeeding (or chestfeeding) and work questions are some of the most common questions received here at Lactation Matters.

We asked our members to share some tips  and strategies with families.

“Talking to your employer prenatally is essential! I’ve found in working with parents in a variety of fields from military to office to restaurants that having this conversation while pregnant helps a lot! Give a proposed schedule to your employer and even discuss the business case for breastfeeding if they should have concerns. Some countries provide protections for working parents—that is worth looking up. Lastly, find a lactation consultant and talk about pumping logistics for while you’re at work, hands-on pumping, when to start collecting milk after having baby, and be sure you’re properly fitted for a pump!” – Tori LaChapelle Sproat, IBCLC

“Keep an eye on how many milk removals (breastfeeds plus pumps) you do in a day. Keeping that “Magic Number” steady after you go back to work should prevent a dip in milk production.” – Nancy Morbacher, IBCLC

“Avoid over-feeding when using a bottle, so that the parent can keep up with the baby’s needs when separated.” – Laura Spitzfaden, IBCLC

“If you have a healthy, term baby that is exclusively breastfed, you don’t need to wash pump parts after  every pumping session. The time saved by tossing the parts in a refrigerator and washing them once at the end of the day really adds up—sometimes it even provides enough time to squeeze in a short pumping session.” – Erica Charpentier, IBCLC

“The strategies that work for one type of job might not be ones that work in another industry. In the U.S., there are a number of tools designed both for parents and for local advocates to use to educate, strategize, and build the business case for breastfeeding. Check out this resource that shows common solutions by industry. And here’s a presentation you can use in your own community.” – Cathy Carothers, IBCLC

“Congratulations on your decision to provide your milk to your baby while you go back to work! Working and breastfeeding/chestfeeding parents really have two jobs, which can be particularly exhausting. It’s worth talking with your employer and with HR ahead of time to make a milk-expressing plan. [If you reside in the United States], The Business Case for Breastfeeding is an absolutely brilliant website you can share with your employer explaining how much money they will save by supporting you in pumping for your baby. If your employer has more than 50 employees, they are obligated to provide a private, non-bathroom space with a sink and fridge for you to pump. Explaining how this benefits their bottom line is essential. Your insurance company should provide you with a pump. If you can, attend a La Leche League meeting in your community or visit an online forum for advice on the best pumps for your situation, and to figure out a pumping schedule. If you do have the opportunity to meet with an IBCLC before your baby is born, or while you are on leave (if you have any leave!), she or he can help you plan for expressing your milk while at work, and breastfeeding when you are with your baby. Good luck!” – Betsy Hoffmeister, IBCLC

Find an IBCLC to help with your questions about lactation and employment or your other breastfeeding questions.

Find an IBCLC®

What is an IBCLC?

An International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC) is a healthcare professional specializing in the clinical management of breastfeeding and lactation.

An IBCLC® is an invaluable asset to breastfeeding families, reassuring you when lactation are going well, and by providing information and support to help prevent and manage common concerns. IBCLCs help with:

  • Prenatal counseling about the factors that may affect breastfeeding, chestfeeding, and lactation
  • Basic position and latch of the infant
  • Information about practices that promote successful lactation
  • Preventing and managing common concerns such as poor latch, inadequate milk transfer or supply, nipple or breast/chest pain, and calming a fussy baby
  • Milk expression and storage for parents who must be separated from their babies
  • Strategies for lactation after returning to work
  • Breastfeeding and lactation in challenging situations, such as feeding twins or triplets, a premature or sick infant, or infants in special medical situations.

Lactation consultants, do you have other tips to share?

Families, do you have questions? Share them here!

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How Does Birth Impact How I Feed My Baby? Best Tips from Lactation Professionals

“Does our birth experience impact our breastfeeding?” Regardless of how your baby was born, lactation consultants can help you establish the breastfeeding relationship you want.

We asked our members to share some tips  and strategies with families.

“How you feel about your birth experience can impact your breastfeeding relationship. The method of birth can present some challenges (Caesarean stitches will need to be worked around) but these do not compare to a parent who has felt that they were a passenger in their own medical care. It can be hard to connect when you’re experiencing these emotions. The good news is that these do not make breastfeeding impossible! If you have questions, help exists. Your goals matter and you deserve to be heard—especially with your breastfeeding journey!” -Tori LaChapelle Sproat

“Absolutely! Our birth experience can have drastic implications on our breastfeeding journey. The most important thing is to advocate for your baby and yourself. Do you need access to a breast pump? Ask for one. Do skin-to-skin as much as possible. Ask for help if you need it or just aren’t sure if things are going well. I also feel it is important to talk about your experience. What happened during your delivery? Find someone you can talk to. Maybe even journal your experience. It is so important to work through the emotions surrounding the memories of our birth experiences, good or bad. Breastfeeding can help you heal if you didn’t get the birth you desired. It provides you and your baby with a beautiful bonding experience that simply cannot be replicated.” -Jennifer Passwaters, IBCLC

“As a midwife, I often get questions about the benefits of delayed cord clamping. The evidence tells us that allowing the cord to pulse naturally gives the baby iron stores that can offset the risk of iron deficiencies in infancy.” – Sarah Davis, LM, IBCLC

“Pretty much all babies are born to breastfeed, no matter how they choose to be born! In my area, all hospitals deposit babies directly onto the parent’s chest immediately after birth. This facilitates early breastfeeding and bonding, even after a c-section. I think it’s important to know that having lots of IV fluids can impact breastfeeding in a few ways.First, it can make babies “extra juicy.” Babies may be born at up to 6% heavier than their expected birth weight, which they lose really rapidly in their first 48 hours. It can look like they are losing a dangerous amount of weight! So it’s important to evaluate in the context of whether baby is eating, peeing, and pooping well. Second, extra IV fluids may cause extra swelling in the feet, legs, hands—and breasts! Swelling, or edema, can make nipples appear flat and can make breasts very hard and uncomfortable. A shortcut is to use a nipple shield, which can be very helpful. But, there are manual tricks for moving fluid out of the breast which is way better for the parent and baby in the long run.

I think it’s very helpful to know that a very prolonged labor can cause a delay in mature milk “coming in” by a day or two, and a c-section can also delay milk coming in by a day or two. In this case, consult with an IBCLC on how to manage feeding the baby while waiting for the milk to come in. Keeping the baby wrapped next to your skin, with his bare face on your bare chest, as much as possible, may be the single most useful thing you can do to help your milk come in and help your baby learn to breastfeed. And most of all, ask for help from an IBCLC in the hospital, from your midwife, or from a community-based IBCLC!” – Betsy Hoffmeister, IBCLC

Find an IBCLC to help with your questions about lactation and employment or your other breastfeeding questions.

Find an IBCLC

What is an IBCLC?

An International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC) is a healthcare professional specializing in the clinical management of breastfeeding and lactation.

An IBCLC is an invaluable asset to breastfeeding families, reassuring you when lactation are going well, and by providing information and support to help prevent and manage common concerns. IBCLCs help with:

  • Prenatal counseling about the factors that may affect breastfeeding, chestfeeding, and lactation
  • Basic position and latch of the infant
  • Information about practices that promote successful lactation
  • Preventing and managing common concerns such as poor latch, inadequate milk transfer or supply, nipple or breast/chest pain, and calming a fussy baby
  • Milk expression and storage for parents who must be separated from their babies
  • Strategies for lactation after returning to work
  • Breastfeeding and lactation in challenging situations, such as feeding twins or triplets, a premature or sick infant, or infants in special medical situations.

Lactation consultants, do you have other tips to share?

Families, do you have questions? Share them here!

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When Should Families Get Help From a Lactation Consultant?

 

“When should I consult with an IBCLC?” Knowing when to ask for assistance is a common question faced by breastfeeding/chestfeeding families.

We asked our members to share some tips  and strategies with families.

“If you perceive a problem and your corrective action isn’t making an improvement within 48 hours.” -Brenda Dalton, IBCLC

“Anytime you have a question or concern related to breastfeeding: before pregnancy, during pregnancy, anytime after baby is born, if you are considering surrogacy/adopting, you have friends or family members or co-workers who are breastfeeding. Even (especially) if you are a healthcare worker or involved in care of children and parents and want to be helpful, encouraging, and supportive.” -Phyllis Kombol, IBCLC

“Call us any time you have questions! . . . Google and Facebook groups can be helpful, but many times overwhelming. Call an IBCLC with your questions – we love what we do and are happy to answer the call. If you’re needing more detailed advice (continuing pain, weight loss concerns, supply concerns) then please find an IBCLC and be seen in person! [The] visit will save you hours of internet browsing and help empower you in your breastfeeding journey!” -Tori LaChapelle Sproat, IBCLC

“Most basic breastfeeding/chestfeeding questions can be answered by community support from [peer-to-peer lactation support groups] and [peer counselors] . . .It is wonderfully comforting to hire an IBCLC even for simple challenges—because it’s so lovely to have a compassionate care provider sit with you and answer all your questions for a few hours! If your insurance covers it or if you have the resources, it’s definitely worth meeting with an IBCLC prior to the birth of your baby for a breastfeeding class. It’s even a nice idea to hire an IBCLC just to make sure everything is going well.” – Betsy Hoffmeister, IBCLC

Find an IBCLC to help with your questions about lactation and employment or your other breastfeeding questions.

Find an IBCLC

What is an IBCLC?

An International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC) is a healthcare professional specializing in the clinical management of breastfeeding and lactation.

An IBCLC is an invaluable asset to breastfeeding families, reassuring you when lactation are going well, and by providing information and support to help prevent and manage common concerns. IBCLCs help with:

  • Prenatal counseling about the factors that may affect breastfeeding, chestfeeding, and lactation
  • Basic position and latch of the infant
  • Information about practices that promote successful lactation
  • Preventing and managing common concerns such as poor latch, inadequate milk transfer or supply, nipple or breast/chest pain, and calming a fussy baby
  • Milk expression and storage for parents who must be separated from their babies
  • Strategies for lactation after returning to work
  • Breastfeeding and lactation in challenging situations, such as feeding twins or triplets, a premature or sick infant, or infants in special medical situations.

Lactation consultants, do you have other tips to share?

Families, do you have questions? Share them here!

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Preparing to Breastfeed: Best Tips from Lactation Professionals

“How should I prepare for breastfeeding before my baby arrives?” Helping families get ready for breastfeeding/chestfeeding is a common role for lactation consultants.

We asked our members to share some tips  and strategies with families.

“ . . . Go and see and be around other nursing mothers, make connections with other families and support people during pregnancy. . .Talk to your partner about what breastfeeding means to you and what you think might be helpful from them (and not). Often the partner (if one is involved) says or does things that hurt the breastfeeding person without realizing it. In my class, we practice how the partner can share and show love and concern by asking what the mom needs in that moment (vs. giving advice or dismissive comments).” -Roxanna Farnsworth, IBCLC

“Ask about your hospital or birth center’s policy on skin-to-skin and the . . .  hours [immediately] after birth. Plan for uninterrupted skin-to-skin and breastfeeding for a minimum of 1-2 hours or longer if needed. Prepare your family that you will be limiting visitors during this time.” -Chasta Carson Hite, IBCLC

“My advice? Take a prenatal breastfeeding class, and set up a prenatal education consult with an IBCLC if you can. Learn & practice hand expression, so you can get good at it by the time you need it- it is really beneficial!” -Bryna Sampey, IBCLC

“Watch others breastfeed, ask lots of questions.” -Claire Clark, IBCLC

“Focus on learning about what normal newborn breastfeeding behaviors are! They are very different from that beautiful 5-month-old you may have seen breastfeeding . . .” -Lynette Beard, IBCLC

“Surround yourself with support (find your village) and join [a peer-to-peer breastfeeding support group].” -Maria Ryan, IBCLC

“Do your homework, join [a peer-to-peer lactation support group] and make contact with your local group. Mothering is jolly hard work . . . not the breastfeeding! The first 6 weeks are the hardest. There is heaps of help and support out there. Know where it is.” -Ellen Prendergast, IBCLC

“Determination is key and having a positive influence for support on your journey. [Take a] breastfeeding prenatal class prior to delivery. [Contact] a lactation consultant in hospital when needed. Having contact information of a lactation consultant and breastfeeding support in your community to support your personal breastfeeding goals so that you can have your best experience possible!” -Angie Hilliard, IBCLC

Find an IBCLC to help with your questions about lactation and employment or your other breastfeeding questions.

Find an IBCLC

What is an IBCLC?

An International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC) is a healthcare professional specializing in the clinical management of breastfeeding and lactation.

An IBCLC is an invaluable asset to breastfeeding families, reassuring you when lactation are going well, and by providing information and support to help prevent and manage common concerns. IBCLCs help with:

  • Prenatal counseling about the factors that may affect breastfeeding, chestfeeding, and lactation
  • Basic position and latch of the infant
  • Information about practices that promote successful lactation
  • Preventing and managing common concerns such as poor latch, inadequate milk transfer or supply, nipple or breast/chest pain, and calming a fussy baby
  • Milk expression and storage for parents who must be separated from their babies
  • Strategies for lactation after returning to work
  • Breastfeeding and lactation in challenging situations, such as feeding twins or triplets, a premature or sick infant, or infants in special medical situations.

Lactation consultants, do you have other tips to share?

Families, do you have questions? Share them here!

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