Archive | ILCA 2011 Conference

Meet Our ILCA Staff – Amanda Joslin

As part of a new series, Lactation Matters will highlight the many amazing staff and board members of ILCA!  For our first article, we introduce to you Amanda Joslin, Director of Conferences.

Tell us a little about yourself.

I started working for ILCA in February of 2011. How time flies! A year later, I still love what I do every day and have learned so much about the importance of breastfeeding. I studied at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina and graduated with a Bachelors of Science in Business Administration (International Business) and Bachelor of Arts (Spanish). I began my career in marketing for a kitchen ventilation company. During my time there, I became the Manager of Marketing Services and planned my first meeting. I was in charge of planning a sales meeting for about 250 sales personnel in Chicago, Illinois. I had no idea what I was doing and I had to learn along the way. I realized, at the completion of that meeting, that becoming a meeting planner was what I had a passion for.

What position do you hold at ILCA and what are your responsibilities?

As ILCA’s Director of Conferences, I work with the Conference Program Committee chair and Education coordinator to coordinate and implement our annual conference and meeting. I have a variety of responsibilities, including preparing meeting specifications, arranging room blocks, coordinating the food and beverage, and facilitating speaker arrangements. I am also involved in the creative direction and fulfillment of the program website, registration brochure, save the date, exhibitor prospectus, conference handbook, signage, on-site materials, and receptions. I negotiate and manage all vendors including entertainment, transportation and printing services. Another one of my responsibilities is researching sites for the upcoming Annual Convention locales. This includes narrowing down a list of prominent locations by conducting site visits, contract review and negotiation, and preparing a summary of proposals for board decision. I am currently working on my Meeting Planner Certification, which I hope to complete in the fall.

What is one thing people may not know about you?

One thing people don’t know about me is that I love to dance! I get ready in the morning and dance to music. I listen and dance to music while in the shower. I try to dance sometimes in my car, but it’s hard sitting down. I’ve always wanted to take a professional hip hop class, but I’m too scared I would be awful at it. Secretly I wish my mom had kept me in dance or ballet longer when I was younger!

I’m looking forward to our upcoming meeting in Orlando, Florida this July. I’m really excited about the new initiatives we have planned and looking forward to seeing everyone again!

What has been the most rewarding highlight while working at ILCA?

Completing my first conference in San Diego in July of 2011. My biggest conference I had coordinated before ILCA was 250 people, and I thought that was huge!

If you could dream of something for the ILCA office, what would it be?

A pool!! Or a hot tub would do – our staff loves hot tub time at the end of a long day at conference!

Amanda Joslin | Director of Conferences

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ILCA Conference 2011 – Reflections

I absolutely love going to ILCA conferences!  While San Diego was quite a treat with its gorgeous weather and fabulous beaches, even the heat of San Antonio and Las Vegas couldn’t diminish the way an ILCA conference re-energizes and makes me feel so proud to be a part of this valuable profession.

Planning my trip to ILCA 2011 was not too challenging, since I live about 10 minutes from where the conference was hosted.  Yet, I still had to juggle clients and my son’s 6th birthday to make it to all of my favorite sessions.  It was so worth it!

The week before the conference, I started to create my ‘plan of attack.’  Which sessions would I attend Thursday through Sunday?  Would I finally learn how to deal with those flat heads and stiff necks?  Is pumping really out of hand?  Where would I meet my friends and colleagues that I met at previous conferences?  Would I have time to peruse the exhibition hall?

I started the conference by attending the Wednesday Clinical Rotations and the rumors from past conferences were all true: What an amazing experience!  It was like having a private session with my favorite experts in the field.  Alison Hazelbaker went through her entire Assessment Tool for Lingual Frenulum Function.  Marsha Walker was so lovely I could just listen to her speak for hours and hours.  The day just flew by!

Thursday through Sunday was a whirlwind, but so many of the things I learned and people I met have influenced my daily practice as a lactation consultant.  At the poster session I met Lenore Goldfarb, who since then has been helping me with a client who is inducing lactation with her adopted son.  I have now mentioned Jane Morton’s video on Hand Expression at least twice a week with new clients and prenatal breastfeeding students.  I have shown samples of the Danish Wool breast pads to several clients with Reynaud’s.  I finally met my fellow marketing committee members face to face for the first time.  I have stayed connected with colleagues I met during lunch and breaks over Facebook and email, which allows us to further our conversations and support one another.

The energy at an ILCA conference is colossal!  The amount of knowledge I obtain in those 4-5 days is immeasurable!  When I leave an ICLA conference I feel smarter, revitalized, invigorated, and supported.  And I can’t wait for the next conference to arrive.  Stay tuned for exciting information about ILCA2012 in Orlando, Florida.

Now it’s your turn to share:

What was your favorite part about ILCA2011?

Who was your favorite speaker? 

What feedback would you like to share?

Robin Kaplan, M.Ed., IBCLC
Co-Editor, Lactation Matters
Owner, San Diego Breastfeeding Center
www.sdbfc.com

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Ethical Issues in Breastfeeding Support

Born in Brooklyn, New York, Dr. Gartner received his undergraduate education at Columbia University and his medical degree from Johns Hopkins University. Returning to New York after internship in Pediatrics at Hopkins, he continued his training in Pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, specializing in neonatology and pediatric liver disease. The great majority of his basic laboratory and clinical research has been in the area of neonatal jaundice, with particular reference to its relationship to breastfeeding. He continued his combined work in bilirubin metabolism and breastfeeding in Chicago and has now published more than 200 papers on this subject and on other aspects of breastfeeding.

Dr. Gartner was Founding Chair of the Executive Committee of the Section on Breastfeeding of the American Academy of Pediatrics from 1998 to 2006. He is also a Past- President of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, of which he is a founder, and a Past-President of the North American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, which he also helped found. He lectures regularly on breastfeeding issues. He is currently Chair of the ABM Ethics Committee.

At the 2011 ILCA Conference in San Diego, CA, Dr. Gartner presented this plenary session titled, “Ethical Issues in Breastfeeding Support.”

Lawrence M. Gartner, M.D., FAAP
Professor Emeritus
Departments of Pediatrics and OB/GYN
The University of Chicago

Ethics is the discipline dealing with what is good and bad or what is right and wrong.  Every health practitioner must adhere to the highest standards of ethical behavior and assure that their practice provides the best possible care for their patients.   As breastfeeding practitioners, we take responsibility for our patients, both the mother and the child, and we must give them every reason to trust our knowledge and our judgment.

To fulfill these ethical standards the practitioner must know the proven scientific facts and accepted practices in the field.  These must always be presented to the patient honestly and completely.  At the same time we must recognize that the mother makes the final decision, based on the information that has been presented to her.  It is never acceptable to use coercion.

Other ethical concerns are to assure confidentiality of all information obtained in the course of caring for the patient. Records must be secure at all times.  Discussion of patients with colleagues or students should be discrete and private, protecting the identity of the patient.  The patient’s privacy must be honored during examinations.  Students may be present at the interview or examination  only with the specific consent of the patient.  One must be aware of cultural differences and  avoid bias in making decisions.  All procedures must be performed only after obtaining fully informed written consent.

Among the most difficult and challenging ethical issues is that of avoiding conflict of interest.   Financial interest in a product that one recommends or provides is a conflict of interest and may result in a recommendation that is not necessarily in the best interest of the patient.  In the practice of breastfeeding an seo consultant, the renting or selling of breastfeeding pumps and supplies is particularly troubling.

In the world of breastfeeding, commercialism or the marketing and sale of products for profit, independent of health care practitioners, has become a major force and often brings a great deal of marketing pressure on breastfeeding mothers and their families.  Most prominent among these are the infant formula companies and their efforts to promote sale of their breastmilk substitutes through practices that are considered unethical or highly questionable.  As practitioners we must make every effort to distance ourselves from their marketing ploys.  Thus, we should not distribute their “educational” materials or hang their posters in our offices.  We also must avoid the subtle temptations of a free lunch or a gift from them as these have been shown to bias our prescribing practices.

We must also have ethical awareness with regard to the hospitals, clinics and other institutions in which we may work or be employed.  These may have conflicts of interest or policies that are not in the best interest of the breastfeeding dyad.  They may provide discharge gift bags possibly because they are being given a grant from the company.  Employees and those who use these facilities can influence the administration to change these unethical practices into ethical ones that improve the environment for breastfeeding.

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Is Pumping Out of Hand? Why Hand Expression in the First 3 Postpartum Days is Important

Stanford trained, Jane Morton, became a partner at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation, where she practiced general pediatrics and was repeatedly recognized by her colleagues as
one of the top pediatricians in the Bay Area.  She was invited to join the Stanford neonatology faculty to develop their Breastfeeding Medicine Program. She designed a nationally recognized educational program, published her original research and traveled extensively and internationally as an invited speaker.  At the 2011 ILCA Conference in San Diego, CA, Jane presented this plenary session titled, “Is Pumping Out of Hand?”

Jane Morton, MD
Cl Professor of Pediatrics
Stanford Pediatrics
www.burgesspediatrics.com
drjane@burgesspediatrics.com

A low milk supply is the most common reason for mothers to stop breastfeeding. (1.)  We have learned that what we do (or do not do) in the first 3 days after delivery can have a major impact on future milk production potential.  In our research, we found that milk production in pump-dependent mothers of preterm babies depended on the frequency they used hand expression in the first 3 days after delivery. (2.)  Mothers who used hand expression more than 5 times a day in the first 3 days yet pumped with the same frequency as other study mothers, expressed an average of 955 mls, about a quart a day by 8 weeks. This is more than a term 4 month old would need. Mothers also found consistent increases in production when they did not rely solely on pump suction alone to remove milk, but used “hands-on pumping”. This technique combines breast massage, compression and hand expression with electric pumping and does not require more time.  Of the 67 study participants, several volunteered to demonstrate hand expression and hands-on pumping on the Stanford website.  (3.)

For mothers of term and late preterm babies, there is an important role for an alternative way to remove colostrum when the infant has not yet learned to latch on and nurse effectively.  About 50% of mothers will have some difficulty getting their babies to latch on well in the first day. (4.) While providing a mother with a pump may be the easiest solution from the nursing standpoint, a recent study suggests it is more effective to teach her to hand express milk after breastfeeding. (5.) At 2 months, mothers assigned to hand expression were more likely to be breastfeeding (96.1%) than mothers assigned to breast pumping (72.7%). (p=0.02)

A smaller study suggests more milk can be removed with manual expression than with a new, double rental-grade pump in the first 48 hrs post partum. (6.) Given the feasibility and safety of spoon feeding, (7.) perhaps the routine practice in the first several days for infants at risk for suboptimal intake and/or mothers at risk for suboptimal milk production should be to encourage hand expression and spoon feeding after breastfeeding. This provides more milk for the baby and more stimulation to the breasts than breastfeeding alone. There seems to be no cost or risk and only potential benefit in this approach.

  1. Ruowei Li, Fein SB, Chen J,
    Grummer-Strawn L. Pediatrics 2008; 122(2):S69-S76.
  2. Morton J, J
    Perinatol. 2009 Nov;29(11):757-64. Epub 2009 Jul 2
  3. http://newborns.stanford.edu/Breastfeeding/  See: Hand
    Expressing Milk — video
    and Maximizing via Katy TX
    Milk Production — video
    . Complete video, Making Enough Milk, the Key to Successful Breastfeeding, can be
    previewed and purchased at www.breastmilksolutions.com
    . Soon available in Spanish
  4. Dewey KG.
    Risk Factors for Suboptimal Breastfeeding Behavior, Delayed Onset of Lactation
    and Excess Neonatal Weight Loss. Pediatrics 2003;112:607-619
  5. Flaherman VJ, Archives of Disease in
    Childhood 2011
  6. Ohyama M. Pediatr Int. 2010
    Feb;52(1):39-43
  7. Kumar A. J Perinatology 2010;
    30:209-217
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