Preventing Malnutrition in All its Forms #WBW2018

International Lactation Consultant Association® (ILCA®) is excited to join World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) and other organizations and individuals the world over in celebrating #WBW2018 1-7 August . The theme of World Breastfeeding Week (WBW) 2018 is Breastfeeding: Foundation of Life. Lactation Matters will feature blog posts and resources throughout the week to help you make the most of this important week.

It has long been recognized that malnutrition with underweight and stunting is common in low-income countries. In addition to this problem, overweight and associated non-communicable diseases are actually a larger contributor to the burden of disease in low-income compared to high-income countries. Lack of breastfeeding can be linked to both underweight and overweight in children. This double burden of malnutrition has major consequences on short- and long-term health.

Optimal breastfeeding helps prevent malnutrition in all its forms with positive lifelong effects on both children and mothers.

Child malnutrition, especially wasting, often results from artificial feeding in low-income settings. Wasting may be prevented indirectly, for example by preventing severe diarrhea. In addition to breastfeeding, many factors affect the optimal growth and development of children, including the introduction, amount, and frequency of complementary feeding. The risk of the other form of malnutrition, overweight and obesity, increases the more a child is artificially fed, and this is becoming more common in all settings.

Breastfeeding also has implications for maternal nutrition. The assumption that mothers will become malnourished and lose weight due to breastfeeding does not appear to be valid. Good maternal nutrition together with optimal birth spacing and access to contraceptives are the main factors for preventing malnutrition. Exclusive breastfeeding also helps mothers return to a healthy pre-pregnancy weight and possibly lowers the risk of her developing diabetes.

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For the most up-to-date information about WBW 2018 and to download promotional materials, please visit the World Breastfeeding Week website by clicking here.

 

1. Child malnutrition. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.who.int/gho/child-malnutrition/en/
2. Akst, J. (2015). Breast Milk and Obesity: A study links components of a mother’s milk to her infant’s growth. Retrieved from https://www.the-scientist.com/
3. Sankar, M. J. et al. (2015). Optimal breastfeeding practices and infant and child mortality: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Acta Paediatrica, 104, 3-13
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Access FREE Articles from Journal of Human Lactation #WBW2018

World Breastfeeding Week (WBW) is an annual celebration of the role of breastfeeding in our homes, our communities, and the world.  As a part of our 2018 theme, Breastfeeding: Foundation for Life, we are proud to announce that Journal of Human Lactation (JHL) is making available 10 essential articles to everyone – FREE* through 31 August 2018.

The Journal of Human Lactation is essential for building our knowledge as IBCLCs. We believe knowledge guides our practice, strengthens our value, and supports our role in transforming world health.

Read the following JHL articles—free through 31 August 2018!*

  1. Interventions to Improve Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy and Resultant Breastfeeding Rates: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis by Meredith Brockway, Karen Benzies, and K. Alix Hayden
  2. Efficacy of an Osteopathic Treatment Coupled With Lactation Consultations for Infants’ Biomechanical Sucking Difficulties: A Randomized Controlled Trial by Juliette Herzhaft-Le Roy, Marianne Xhignesse, and Isabelle Gaboury
  3. The Atlantic Divide: Contrasting U.K. and U.S. Recommendations on Cosleeping and Bed-Sharing by Helen L. Ball
  4. The Impact of a Prenatal Education Video on Rates of Breastfeeding Initiation and Exclusivity during the Newborn Hospital Stay in a Low-income Population by Kathleen A. Marinelli, Sara L. Gill, Ann L. Kellams, Kelly K. Gurka, Paige P. Hornsby, Emily Drake, Mark Riffon, Daphne Gellerson, Gauri Gulati, and Valerie Coleman
  5. Randomized Controlled Trial on Effect of Intermittent Early Versus Late Kangaroo Mother Care on Human Milk Feeding in Low-Birth-Weight Neonates by Dhaarani Jayaraman, Kanya Mukhopadhyay, Anil Kumar Bhalla, and Lakhbir Kaur Dhaliwal
  6. Advising Mothers on the Use of Medications during Breastfeeding: A Need for a Positive Attitude by Kathleen A. Marinelli, Sara L. Gill, Riccardo Davanzo, Jenny Bua, Angela De Cunto, Maria Luisa Farina, Fabrizio De Ponti, Antonio Clavenna, Stefania Mandrella, Antonella Sagone, and Maurizio Clementi
  7. Enforcing the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes for Better Promotion of Exclusive Breastfeeding: Can Lessons Be Learned? by Kathleen A. Marinelli, Sara L. Gill, Hubert Barennes, Guenther Slesak, Sophie Goyet, Percy Aaron, and Leila M. Srour
  8. Public Attitudes Toward Breastfeeding in Public Places in Ottawa, Canada by Katherine Russell and Amira Ali
  9. Gestalt Breastfeeding: Helping Mothers and Infants Optimize Positional Stability and Intraoral Breast Tissue Volume for Effective, Pain-Free Milk Transfer by Pamela Douglas and Renee Keogh
  10. Obesity as a Predictor of Delayed Lactogenesis II by Irma Preusting, Jessica Brumley, Linda Odibo, Diane L. Spatz, and Judette M. Louis

Journal of Human Lactation is the official journal of ILCA. It is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal publishing original research, insights in practice and policy, commentaries, and case reports relating to research and practice in human lactation and breastfeeding. JHL is relevant to lactation professionals in clinical practice, public health, research, and a broad range of fields related to the trans-disciplinary field of human lactation.

*You may already have access to these articles through a library or other subscription.

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Happy World Breastfeeding Week! #WBW2018

Happy World Breastfeeding Week! International Lactation Consultant Association® (ILCA®) is excited to join World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) and other organizations and individuals the world over in celebrating #WBW2018. The theme of World Breastfeeding Week (WBW) 2018 is Breastfeeding: Foundation of Life. Lactation Matters will feature blog posts and resources throughout the week of 1-7 August to help you make the most of this important week.

Are you ready to celebrate #WBW2018? Check out this must-do list to be sure:

Visit the #WBW2018 website for general information and downloadable promotional materials, including Announcement, Logo, Poster, Action Folder and other forms of multimedia. These materials are available in many languages and contain information on the theme, relevant facts and figures, case studies, and suggested ways to take action.

Share your commitment to breastfeeding advocacy and education. The links between breastfeeding and good nutrition, food security, and poverty reduction may be obvious to breastfeeding advocates, but there is still work to be done to make these connections clear to others. Thinking of organizing your own WBW event? Then Pledge and Report your event to be placed on the Pledge Map and receive an e-certificate for each event you organize. Use the #WBW2018 Media Kit that contains information about the annual WBW campaign as well as the 2018 Press Release for your events. Join the online social media movement by participating in WABA interaction, polls, and activities such as the upcoming #AskMeAnything session through their Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages. Don’t forget to view the Social Media Kit that is frequently updated with visuals, infographics, GIFs, sample posts, and relevant hashtags.

Look for information and action steps throughout WBW at Lactation Matters, where you’ll find articles, images, action steps, and more to help with your successful WBW 2018 observance.

 

For the most up-to-date information about WBW 2018 and to download promotional materials, please visit the World Breastfeeding Week website by clicking here.

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LAST CHANCE to REGISTER for the #ILCA18 Virtual Conference

Whether you plan to participate live or watch the recording, TODAY is the last chance to register for the 
#ILCA18 Virtual Conference.

Don’t miss out!

The #ILCA18 Virtual Conference begins tomorrow, July 20 and continues through 21 July. You won’t want to miss the opportunity to join us . . . right from your computer!

We will be offering up to 12 Continuing Education Credits, a special online community, and an easy-to-use platform with lots of support. Watch live or on your own time for up to 60 days.

Click below for more information and to register. Questions? Email us at info@ilca.org.

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ILCA Statement on WHA Resolution on Infant and Young Child Feeding

All families deserve public health policies designed to improve their health and well-being that are free from corporate interests. This is why the International Lactation Consultant Association® (ILCA®) calls upon governments to protect, promote and support breastfeeding. This includes holding businesses accountable for misleading marketing practices that unfairly target vulnerable women and children and directly impact breastfeeding.

This statement is in response to events reported by the New York Times. The article, “Opposition to Breast-Feeding Resolution by U.S. Stuns World Health Officials” reported on U.S.-delegation opposition to a resolution that aimed to call upon member states to strengthen promotion, protection and support for breastfeeding.

The resolution was to be introduced by Ecuador and “expected to be approved quickly and easily by the hundreds of government delegates who had gathered . . . ” According to the article, Ecuador unexpectedly withdrew the resolution in response to threats made by delegates representing the United States. “The Americans were blunt: If Ecuador refused to drop the resolution, Washington would unleash punishing trade measures and withdraw crucial military aid. The Ecuadorean government quickly acquiesced.”

Ultimately, a weaker resolution was adopted after being introduced by Russia. These actions took place at the World Health Assembly in Geneva in May 2018.

The proposed resolution included a number of key protections for breastfeeding families, including strengthening efforts to reduce predatory marketing of breastmilk substitutes and providing additional supports for families in emergencies. To be clear, it did not deny families access to breast milk substitutes.

As an organization, ILCA envisions “world health transformed by skilled lactation care;” a world in which human beings have every opportunity to thrive through breastfeeding. As such, ILCA stands in support of The Code and subsequent resolutions. ILCA also stands in unwavering support of families everywhere, to make decisions that are best for their families. When breast milk substitutes are desired or required, International Board Certified Lactation Consultants® (IBCLCs®) and other skilled lactation professionals are qualified to assist families in the safe preparation, storage and feeding according to WHO guidelines. For parents choosing to breastfeed, this means navigating a host of unique challenges to the breastfeeding family. Challenges may be clinical but also social. Social policies such as adequate maternity leave and the right to breastfeed or express milk in the workplace work in favor of breastfeeding continuation whereas the absence of supportive and protective policies work against breastfeeding continuation.

The NYT article sheds light on how corporate interest interferes with public health policy designed to improve health and well-being. The article also highlights the role that governments have to promote, protect and support breastfeeding rather than side with businesses to support corporate gains. ILCA strongly supports systems and structures that shift the responsibility for breastfeeding success away from parents and toward social policies that make breastfeeding easier, not more difficult.

As frontline health professionals, IBCLCs and other lactation caregivers around the globe know first-hand the challenges that families face in providing their children with the best nutritional start to life. Therefore, ILCA calls upon governments to protect, promote and support breastfeeding.

ILCA has for many years provided representation at key meetings like the WHA, and will continue to do so. ILCA stands with other global allies and urges its members and partners to continue to advocate for policies that strengthen the promotion, protection and support of breastfeeding at the government level. ILCA urges skilled lactation professionals all over the world to continue to provide individualized specialized clinical care to families while advocating at the local/regional/country level for policies that support the families in our care.

On behalf of the Board of Directors,

 

 

 

Michele Griswold, PhD, MPH, RN, IBCLC

ILCA President

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In just one week! Hear why others are attending the ILCA Virtual Conference

We asked past conference participants what they valued most about the virtual conference:

It has given me the confidence I needed to be a better lactation consultant.

Why join the #ILCA18 virtual conference?

We all have busy lives between our roles at work and home.The virtual conference allows participation in the annual ILCA conference that many of us would miss otherwise. The speakers are both fascinating and informative.Thank you, ILCA!

Earn up to 12 Continuing Education Credits, a special online community, and an easy-to-use platform with lots of support. Watch live or on your own time for up to 60 days.

Great way to feel a part of ILCA on the international scale. So many of us are a bit isolated and the virtual conference helps to connect us to the big picture of what an IBCLC can mean to mothers who would like some help and encouragement.

Only one more week to register!

I want to thank the organizers for including this opportunity to view again. It allows me the opportunity to have better clarity of the information.

Click below for more information and to register. Questions? Email us at info@ilca.org.

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Get Ready for World Breastfeeding Week: 1-7 August 2018

In a world filled with inequality, crises, and poverty, breastfeeding is the foundation of lifelong good health for babies and mothers. Please join us in celebrating Breastfeeding: Foundation of Life, the theme of World Breastfeeding Week (WBW) 2018. The week of 1-7 August 2018 is coordinated by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) and highlights that breastfeeding is a universal solution that levels the playing field, giving everyone a fair start in life. Lactation Matters will feature blog posts and resources throughout the week to make sure you can make the most of this important week.

Need help preparing for #WBW2018? Check out this list of ideas and resources:

Visit the WBW 2018 website for general information and downloadable promotional materials, including the WBW 2018 Action Folder. The action folder information on the theme, and includes useful facts and figures, infographics, case studies, and suggested ways to take action.

Share your commitment to breastfeeding advocacy and education. The links between breastfeeding and nutrition, food security, and poverty reduction may be obvious to breastfeeding advocates, but there is still work to be done to make these connections clear to others. We know what needs to be done to support and enable families to breastfeed optimally, but we need to be more proactive and engage more people to make this a reality.

Look for information and action steps throughout WBW at Lactation Matters, where you’ll find articles, images, action steps, and more to help with your successful WBW 2018 observance.

For the most up-to-date information about WBW 2018 and to download promotional materials, please visit the World Breastfeeding Week website by clicking here.

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Joint Position On Separation of Parents and Children from IBLCE, ILCA, and LEAARC

The International Lactation Consultant Association® (ILCA®), the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners® (IBLCE®), and the Lactation Education Accreditation and Approval Review Committee (LEAARC) stand together in opposition to policies that unnecessarily separate a parent from their infant or young child.

The unnecessary separation of parents and young children has lifelong physical, psychological, and emotional impacts that have been well documented by health organizations worldwide, including UNICEF and the American Academy of Pediatrics, regardless of feeding status. In addition to these serious consequences, separation also disrupts breastfeeding, leading to further potential harm.

For breastfeeding to occur, mothers and babies must have unrestricted access and physical proximity to one another. The importance of breastfeeding for both infants and parents is well documented. These health protections extend into adulthood.1,2 Because of the range of health benefits conferred on the breastfeeding dyad, breastfeeding is recommended by the World Health Organization3 for up to two years of age or beyond. Separating parents from their breastfeeding children during this critical time has long-term consequences.

As organizations committed to ensuring worldwide health through support of parents and young children, we stand in opposition to policies that unnecessarily limit access to or separate parent and child.

Maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health: Breastfeeding. World Health Organization. Retrieved from www.who.int/maternal_child_adolescent/topics/child/nutrition/breastfeeding/en/ Date accessed 6/20/2018.
Victora, C., Bahl, R., Barros, A., França, G., Horton, S., Krasevec, J., …Rollins, N. Breastfeeding in the 21st century: epidemiology, mechanisms, and lifelong effect. The Lancet, 387(10017), 475-490. doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(15)01024-7
3 Nutrition: The World Health Organization’s infant feeding recommendation. World Health Organization. Retrieved from www.who.int/nutrition/topics/infantfeeding_recommendation/en/ Date accessed 6/20/2018.
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JHL Call for Papers: State of the Science

Journal of Human Lactation (JHL) invites submissions to an upcoming issue with the theme State of the Science. State of the science articles are valuable to clinicians, educators and researchers, because their critical analyses provide evidence for standards of practice, establish the current level of knowledge on a topic, and highlight gaps in the evidence pointing the directions for future research. Click here to view JHL‘s new author submission guidelines.

It is our goal to bring our readership the most up-to-date information available. To facilitate this goal we are calling for critical literature reviews and meta-analyses, using established methodologies, about any one of the many and varied aspects of lactation. We are not interested in a summary or a synthesis of a body of literature, rather accepted manuscripts will provide a critical analysis of the evidence that identifies gaps in what we know, evaluates methodologies researchers have used and hypotheses the next steps needed to continue building our evidence.

The submission deadline for the special issue is 1 February 2019.

Click HERE to submit your manuscript online.

Journal of Human Lactation (JHL) is the top-ranked breastfeeding journal and the most valued benefit of ILCA membership. It is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal publishing original research, insights in practice and policy, commentaries, and case reports relating to research and practice in human lactation and breastfeeding. JHL is relevant to lactation professionals in clinical practice, public health, research, and a broad range of fields related to the trans-disciplinary field of human lactation.

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ILCA Announces New Directors

The International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) Board of Directors is pleased to announce two new Directors: Stephanie George and Angela Love-Zaranka. Stephanie comes to the Board through election by ILCA membership. Board member Lisa Akers is stepping down from her second term as Board Treasurer so she can devote more time to the newest member of her family. Angela has been appointed by the Board to finish the last two years of Lisa’s term. Both of our new Directors will begin their terms in July 2018 at the Annual Conference. We look forward to working with them to continue ILCA’s mission: to advance the International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC®) profession worldwide through leadership, advocacy, professional development, and research.

Stephanie is an IBCLC and Aboriginal Midwife from Jarvis, Ontario, Canada. She is passionate about honoring and empowering all women through her healthcare practice. She also advocates for this platform through her roles on the National Aboriginal Council of Midwives, the Baby-Friendly Initiative Strategy of Ontario, and the Expert Panel of the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario. She hopes to continue this important work as a Board Member at ILCA, specifically through increasing access to education for lactation consultants around the world. Stephanie has served ILCA in the past as a member of the Conference Program Task Force.

Angela has always enjoyed both serving breastfeeding families in a clinical setting and doing behind-the-scenes work to support the profession. She began her career as a mother-to-mother breastfeeding support professional in 1990. As she worked to earn her IBCLC, Angela began volunteering for the Virginia and West Virginia Chapter of La Leche League International, eventually serving as their Finance Director and President. Another project she completed on the state level was serving as faculty for the Virginia Maternity Quality Improvement Collaborative, which supported hospitals in moving towards baby-friendly accreditation. Her next step was to the international level. She joined the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners as a Board Member in 2006. Some of her duties included chairing the Finance, Audit, and Governance committees and overseeing the revision of several documents key to the lactation consultant profession. Angela is originally from Oklahoma and is proud of her Native American ancestry. She has resided in the Washington D.C. Metropolitan area for the past thirty years.  Her current passion is learning about integrative medicine and traditional medicine from around the world.

We are proud to have Stephanie George and
Angela Love-Zaranka join the ILCA Board of Directors.

The ILCA Board would like to thank each of you for your continued support. To find out more, please visit our website at www.ilca.org.

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